Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Welcome to Celiac Brain: 400% Increased Risk of Death if Undiagnosed

I have been studying Celiac disease and its other 
manifestation, gluten sensitivity since 1995. I have become aware of its hidden and virtually unknown consequences. And it is very common. I am a physician, practicing since 1977, and have seen the devastating effects of celiac/gluten sensitivity first hand. I have seen remarkable turnarounds of very seriously ill persons when they have been on a diet free of gluten.


This site is to spread the word of its serious and dangerous nature to those interested, whether you are a physician, other health care professional, or a person in need of more information.


I propose to bring to you the newest in scientific research, links to other reputable celiac disease/gluten sensitivity websites, and other helpful articles or news items.


The most important finding I would like to impress upon all people comes from Dr. Joseph Murray from the Mayo clinic and that is the 400% increased risk of death by age 65 in undiagnosed persons with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. This information highlights the need to get a diagnosis as early as possible to allow you to reverse the damage, if possible.


And to relax, if you don't have genetics.


I push for ALL to get tested and as early in life as possible. With proper diet and treatment, one can "buy back your time!" and extend ones healthy life span by decades. See Dr. Murray's video.



400% increased risk of death by age 65 in undiagnosed celiacs
Dr.Joseph Murray and his team from the Mayo clinic reported on a small but significant study they published in 2009. Not only was there an astronomically elevated death rate, but they noticed that there has been a 400% increase in the incidence of celiac disease since 1948.

Listen to Dr. Murray::


So get tested and find out if you are one of the 40% of people that are susceptible. The best testing, in my opinion, is a genetic test found at www.enterolab.comI don't have any financial benefit from recommending the company. I have found this testing has revolutionized my practice and my ability to help people.

If you find yourself with gluten sensitivity, go on a gluten free diet, or better yet, the Gut and Psychology Syndrome diet. This diet includes healing foods and nutrients that positively affect the main problems: the damaged bowel and the wrong microbiota, "bugs living in the bowel", malnutrition, poor immune system. 


Untreated celiac or gluten sensitivity leads to increased infections, food allergies of all kinds, epilepsy, rashes, depression, 4 times the rate cancer, inflamed intestines, and 12 times risk of autoimmune diseases like type 1 Diabetes.

To Your Health
Dr. Barbara (TM)
CeliacBrain (TM) is the trademark and copyright of Dr. Barbara Powell. The right of Dr. Barbara Powell to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted by her in accordance with the Copyright, Patent and Designs Act 1988.
Note that all information on these pages is accurate to the best of our knowledge. Information from secondary sources should be double checked before being cited. Information is not meant to be medical advice. Please see your family doctor if you have concerns.

Screening for Celiac Disease: the use of HLA First?

The arguments for a step wise genetic screening for celiac disease made by a group of rheumatologists who wrote the following article are solid. If the risk of getting or having celiac disease is virtually zero in someone without the genetics of HLA DQ 2.5 or HLA DQ8 then the person with a medical problem associated with celiac disease (like an autoimmune disease) without these genetic markers doesn't need a small bowel biopsy. 

As the genetics tests become more economical than celiac blood tests, and are more accurate than celiac blood tests, then it makes sense to start with genetic HLA testing.


Read the full article here from International Journal of Celiac Disease, 2017.

Here is an excerpt: My Bold


3. A Step Wise Serology/Genetic Approach

CD patients negative for any of these HLA alleles are very rare. Therefore, the absence of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 heterodimer makes diagnosis of celiac disease very unlikely (sensitivity >96 %). HLA typing of patients has been included as a useful test to exclude celiac disease in the ESPGHAN guidelines for CD diagnosis. [8, 9] HLA typing confers a high negative predictive value: patients with a negative HLA (i.e. neither DQ2 nor DQ8) will not develop CD; and a suggested strategy to avoid repeated CD screening would be to first perform an HLA test. [10]

Targeting the HLA risk first, rather than tracking positive serology, would be a reasonable step-up approach, probably cost effective and time saving: in the past, HLA typing has been expensive and time-consuming, but new single nucleotide polymorphisms techniques [11] and other combined home-made procedures [12] have recently been reported as very cost-effective and work-time saving for HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 genotyping in CD screening................

In general population, the preferred test to screen for CD is the measurement of IgA TTG [Link here to a critique of the IgA TTG test]along with total serum IgA to avoid false-negative results due to selective IgA deficiency. Positive serology would lead to endoscopic small intestinal biopsies [14]. These serological tests, based on TTG associated to endomysial and deamidated gliadin peptides antibodies are recognized as performant screening tools. [15]

However, in asymptomatic members of a high-risk group, like those presenting RA, it seems reasonable to test first for negative result of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 in order to exclude CD, so that further serologic testing would be unnecessary [16]. Performing HLA genetic typing seems cost effective and could avoid subsequent fiberoscopies and biopsies [17].................recent studies emerging from the South Hemisphere confer solid arguments to such strategies [18] as CD is reported to be strongly associated with HLA-DQ2 in these regions [19].

It is my opinion and the opinion of these authors that the genetic tests for HLA provides a flexible, cost-effective methodology that could be applied to protocols to diagnose celiac disease and to obtain accurate estimates of the prevalence of CD in large cohort studies. The ESPGHAN guidelines for CD diagnosis are worth a look if you are interested in clinical matters.

To Your Health
Dr. Barbara (TM)
CeliacBrain (TM)